Loading...
Core Programme 2018-03-08T18:41:16+00:00

The Core Programme

Helping Students To Find Their Voice

“Learn the rules likes a pro, so you can break them like an artist”

Pablo Picasso

There is no one way to debate, as what works for one speaker might not work for another. Debate-Ed provides you with tips on structure, form and execution to help you succeed. The knack is to find your own strengths as a debater and play to them.

You might be great at thinking on your feet, so you can respond quickly to counter-arguments. You might be funny and able to use humour to complement your speaking style. You might be a naturally charismatic speaker and able to coin a phrase. Equally, you might hate public speaking, but be great at dissecting arguments. The purpose of Debate-Ed is to teach the students the rules of debating and the basics of public speaking so that in time they can use these tools to help them to develop their own effective style and to become better debaters.

As your skills develop, you will find you have developed your own style and what works for you. Learn the rules, then break them!

The Debate-Ed Core Programme
Find more about the Debate-Ed programme

Working With Schools In Shropshire

Following the inception of the programme, Debate-Ed has worked with the Priory School, the Meole Brace School, the Prestfelde School, the Grange School and Shrewsbury Sixth Form College. For each participating school, we deliver 10 workshops every year as part of the Core Programme. These are interactive workshops that help the students to develop their skills and increase their confidence when speaking in front of their peers and others. For schools unable to take part in the Core Programme but interested in providing a fun and engaging learning experience for their students, we also offer a crash course of 1-3 workshops.

The Journey So Far…

As of December 2017, over 400 students have taken part in Debate-Ed. We have received great feedback from the schools about the workshops – often commenting that the activities are particularly beneficial for quieter students, helping them engage in the classroom debate confidently, while also challenging those who already have a passion for arguing!

At the end of the recent school year, 97% of the students said they had enjoyed debating in their workshops. A number of the students commented on how fun they had found it to debate views with other people and to learn about public speaking and the wider world. When asked if they would like to do debating again, 80% of students said that they would like to, with one student stating they ‘had never been interested in debating, but now find it fun and interesting’.

Take a look at the Debate-Ed blog
English Speaking Board

English Speaking Board

Debate-Ed is delighted to partner with the English Speaking Board (ESB) to offer students in Shrewsbury the opportunity to obtain formal debating qualifications. Tina Renshaw, chief executive of the ESB said: “Our innovative debating qualifications aim to improve learners’ critical thinking, analysis, and problem-solving skills, as well as allowing them to develop their public speaking skills.”

These qualifications really complement the educational workshops provided by the Debate-Ed programme. If your school is interested in participating, please get in touch.

‘I loved it. I really love debating and find it very enjoyable. It also gave me an opportunity to learn techniques. It was fantastic!!!’

Student

‘I enjoyed the debating programme as it helped me improve my confidence and I am more able to speak to my peers.’

Student

‘We have been so grateful to establish links with the local 6th form, which we have been wanting to do for a while as this will encourage and inspire pupils to look forward to education after learning in a school environment. The pupils really enjoyed the experience of learning to debate and it stands them in good stead when they go to university or any further place of learning. The pupils loved doing something in lessons that was a bit different and that wasn’t entirely based on learning for the sake of a formal assessment.’

Teacher